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0001 Jun 1
8 minutes read

Book: The Information Diet


All of the Underlined Text

«information overload» (p. 15) «The Shallows: How the Internet Is Rewiring Our Brains» (p. 16) «ConsumerReports.org and NationalGeographic. com» (p. 123) «Eli Pariser» (p. 124) «http://informationdiet.com/local" (p. 133) «RFK Stadium» (p. 139) «SeeClickFix.com» (p. 148) «SEC» (p. 151) «Martin Luther» (p. 153) «Code for Americ» (p. 153) «Civic Commons project» (p. 153) «There are networks of journalists looking for developers across the country.» (p. 154) «Knight Foundation» (p. 155) «Imhotep» (p. 155) «Pyramid of Djoser» (p. 155) «Martin Luther and his 95 Theses» (p. 155) «Rep. Steve Scalise of Louisana» (p. 156) «CodeNow» (p. 156)- - -

All of the Highlighted Text

[*]:** For 200 years the newspaper front page dominated public thinking. In the last 20 years that picture has changed. Today television news is watched more often than people read newspapers, than people listen to radio, than people read or gather any other form of communication. The reason: people are lazy. With television you just sit-watch-listen. The thinking is done for you. (p. 40)

[*]:** Giving people what they want is far more profitable than giving them the facts (p. 42)

[*]:** In prime time, CNN is now a third-place network—it’s beaten by MSNBC and Fox’s personality-driven journalism night after night. Fox News is in first place on the right, and MSNBC is second on the left. CNN sits at the bottom in the middle, providing real news that nobody wants to hear. (p. 43)

[*]:** news networks have turned into affirmation distributors (p. 43)

[*]:** personalization isn’t an evil algorithm telling us what our corporate overlords want us to hear; rather, it’s a reflection of our own behavior. (p. 35)

[*]:** the information overload community tends to rely on technical filters—the equivalent of trying to lose weight by rearranging the shelves in your refrigerator. (p. 37)

[*]:** There’s so much I need to know that I didn’t know I needed to know! (p. 45)

[*]:** Though we constantly complain of it—of all the news, and emails, and status updates, and tweets, and the television shows that we feel compelled to watch—the truth is that information is not requiring you to consume it (p. 36)

[*]:** We traded memorization for the ability to learn less about more—for choice. (p. 33)

Summary: A squirrel dying in front of your house may be more relevant to your interests right now than people dying in Africa (p. 120)

Summary: actionable, relevant, and important to our connections with other human beings (p. 122)

Summary: Agnotology (p. 69)

Summary: agnotology as the study of culturally induced doubt, particularly through the production of seemingly factual data. It’s a modern form of manufactured ignorance. (p. 69)

Summary: anxiety and mood disorders (p. 87)

Summary: as we sit there in (p. 75)

Summary: Attention Fatigue (p. 78)

Summary: attention fitness (p. 133)

Summary: bias journal (p. 125)

Summary: Buteyko breathing exercises (p. 77)

Summary: carbohydrates (p. 86)

Summary: confirmation bias (p. 57)

Summary: data literacy into four major components—you need to know how to search, you need to know how to filter and process, you need to know how to produce, and you need to know how to synthesize. (p. 91)

Summary: digital literacy (p. 133)

Summary: Dopamine makes us seek, which causes us to receive more dopamine, which causes us to seek more. (p. 62)

Summary: Dunbar’s number. (p. 79)

Summary: Emile Zola (p. 131)

Summary: encourage the consumption of local information that’s low on our metaphorical trophic pyramid (p. 133)

Summary: Epistemic Closure (p. 70)

Summary: Everyblock (p. 120)

Summary: executive function (p. 99)

Summary: FDA’s Nutritional Label (p. 140)

Summary: front of our computers, we are slowly killing ourselves just waiting for the next hit of dopamine to come into our inbox. (p. 76)

Summary: Google’s Fusion Tables, Socrata, and Factual. (p. 94)

Summary: healthy information diet (p. 133)

Summary: healthy information diet contains as few advertisements as possible (p. 122)

Summary: helps keep us from losing our social breadth (p. 125)

Summary: Heuristics (p. 56)

Summary: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/linda-stone/just-breathe-building-the_b_85651.html (p. 77)

Summary: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/05/18/090518fa_fact_lehrer (p. 98)

Summary: humor (p. 133)

Summary: If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be (p. 130)

Summary: If we really want to fix our government, we’ve got to be participants in the way government works, not who it employs. (p. 146)

Summary: important to seek out diverse topics of information, as the synthesis of information from different fields helps us create better ideas (p. 125)

Summary: information about the people closest to us—is (p. 121)

Summary: information consumption makes you sedentary, and sometimes, it ruins your sense of time. (p. 75)

Summary: InformationDiet.com (p. 100)

Summary: is less a matter (p. 112)

Summary: It should never be your goal to analyze data to make a point, but rather to analyze it to tell the truth. (p. 155)

Summary: keeping our desire for affirmation in check (p. 127)

Summary: Kickstarter (p. 126)

Summary: knightcomm.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/InformingCommunities Sustaining_Democracy_in_the_Digital_Age.pdf (p. 94)

Summary: lack of will to focus (p. 99)

Summary: Like running a marathon, our ability to focus depends as much on our will as it does our natural ability. (p. 100)

Summary: like Twitter and Google+ allow you to craft a diverse set of information inputs. (p. 124)

Summary: Linda Stone (p. 76)

Summary: local information (p. 134)

Summary: Loss of Social Breadth (p. 79)

Summary: most vital thing after basic literacy for the education of yourself and your children is digital literacy and STEM education: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. (p. 156)

Summary: neuroplasticity (p. 59)

Summary: Our information diets are also tied to our professions (p. 126)

Summary: poor information consumption (p. 76)

Summary: scientific papers, patents, and laws through scholar.google.com (p. 92)

Summary: screen addiction (p. 84)

Summary: solve problems using your skills. (p. 155)

Summary: take the long view, and create more value than you capture. (p. 155)

Summary: TED (p. 126)

Summary: the ability to search, process, filter, and share (p. 133)

Summary: the developers build the lenses that the rest of us look through to get our information. (p. 153)

Summary: The further up the chain you go, the less energy you get. (p. 91)

Summary: The goings-on of your state representatives and city and county governments, along with your school boards and other local government offices are the best, healthiest forms of content for political news, and should be consumed over the national or global news. (p. 149)

Summary: The great lie politicians like me tell people like you is ‘vote for me and I’ll solve all your problems.’ The truth is, you have the power. (p. 136)

Summary: The Internet is the single biggest creator of ignorance mankind has ever created, as well as the single biggest eliminator of that ignorance (p. 93)

Summary: The Khan Academy (p. 125)

Summary: The ones who can link the public with the truth most effectively today aren’t journalists, they’re developers. (p. 153)

Summary: There’s no money in shaking the crown of power from a lowly perch. There is money in feeding novel info to a ravenous, neophilic audience. (p. 47)

Summary: There’s nothing wrong with eating at the same place every day, but sometimes you need to branch out and see what else is out there. (p. 126)

Summary: Transparency isn’t a replacement for integrity and honesty; it’s an infrastructural tool that allows for those attributes to occur—but only if the public is willing act upon the information that they receive as a result of transparency in a conscious, deliberate way. (p. 145)

Summary: trophic pyramid (p. 88)

Summary: tune into the things that matter most and to tune out the things that make them sick (p. 153)

Summary: watching the games themselves is far more important to understanding the game than listening to the pundits prattle on about it. (p. 151)

Summary: we’re products of the food we eat. (p. 15)

Summary: work on stuff that matters (p. 155)

Summary: Worry about consuming consciously, and making information—and our information providers—work for you (p. 127)


All of the Highlighted Text

[*]:** For 200 years the newspaper front page dominated public thinking. In the last 20 years that picture has changed. Today television news is watched more often than people read newspapers, than people listen to radio, than people read or gather any other form of communication. The reason: people are lazy. With television you just sit-watch-listen. The thinking is done for you. (p. 40)

[*]:** Giving people what they want is far more profitable than giving them the facts (p. 42)

[*]:** In prime time, CNN is now a third-place network—it’s beaten by MSNBC and Fox’s personality-driven journalism night after night. Fox News is in first place on the right, and MSNBC is second on the left. CNN sits at the bottom in the middle, providing real news that nobody wants to hear. (p. 43)

[*]:** news networks have turned into affirmation distributors (p. 43)

[*]:** personalization isn’t an evil algorithm telling us what our corporate overlords want us to hear; rather, it’s a reflection of our own behavior. (p. 35)

[*]:** the information overload community tends to rely on technical filters—the equivalent of trying to lose weight by rearranging the shelves in your refrigerator. (p. 37)

[*]:** There’s so much I need to know that I didn’t know I needed to know! (p. 45)

[*]:** Though we constantly complain of it—of all the news, and emails, and status updates, and tweets, and the television shows that we feel compelled to watch—the truth is that information is not requiring you to consume it (p. 36)

[*]:** We traded memorization for the ability to learn less about more—for choice. (p. 33)


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